New Tax Law Extenders for Businesses

/, Blog/New Tax Law Extenders for Businesses

New Tax Law Extenders for Businesses

As usual Congress has waited until the 9th hour to announce tax provisions that were extended into 2015 or made permanent. This is basically par for the course and is done every single year.

Take a look at this long list of provisions that are pretty important to most small business taxpayers.

18535087_s

BUSINESS PROVISIONS:

 

Research CreditTax law provides a tax credit of up to 20% of qualified expenditures for businesses that develop, design or improve products, processes, techniques, formulas or software (and similar activities). The credit has been available off and on since 1981 without being made permanent. It had been extended several times but had expired at the end of 2014. This credit has been retroactively made permanent. In addition, it is not a tax preference for small businesses.

100% Exclusion of Gain – Certain Small Business StockPreviously, for stock issued after September 27, 2010, and before January 1, 2015, non-corporate taxpayers could exclude 100% of any gain realized on the sale or exchange of qualified small business stock held for more than 5 years. In addition, there was no alternative minimum tax (AMT) preference when the exclusion percentage was 100%. Generally, the term qualified small business means any domestic C corporation with assets of $50 million or less. This provision has been made permanent.

Differential Wage Payment CreditThrough 2014, eligible small business employersgenerally those that have an average of fewer than 50 employees and that pay a individual called into active duty military service all or part of the wages that they would have otherwise received from the employercan claim a credit. This differential wage payment credit is equal to 20% of up to $20,000 of differential pay made to an employee during the tax year. This credit has been retroactively made permanent; for years after 2015, the credit will apply to any size employer.

Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) Through 2014, employers could elect to claim a WOTC for up to 40% of employees’ first-year wages for hiring workers from targeted groups not exceeding wages of $6,000 (a maximum credit of $2,400). First-year wages are wages paid during the tax year for work performed during the one-year period beginning on the date when the employee begins work for the employer. This credit has been retroactively extended for five years through 2019; it applies to veterans and non-veterans and adds qualified long-term unemployment recipients to the list of targeted groups for years after 2015.

Section 179 ElectionSince 2003, the Section 179 election has been temporarily increased from its statutory limit of $25,000 to between $100,000 and $500,000. Since 2010, the expense cap has been $500,000 (or $250,000 on a marriedfilingseparate tax return), and the investment limit has been $2 million. However, the last extension expired after 2014; without an extension, the cap would have returned to the statutory $25,000 limit in 2015. The statutory expensing limit of $500,000 and the $2 million investment limit have both been made permanent.

The application of the Section 179 election to “off-the-shelf computer software, qualified leasehold improvements, qualified restaurant property and qualified retail improvements has also been made permanent.

Leasehold and Retail Improvements and Restaurant PropertyThe class life for qualified leasehold and retail improvements and restaurant property had been temporarily included in the 15-year depreciation class life, as opposed to the 31-year category. Qualified leasehold and retail Improvements and restaurant property have been retroactively and permanently included in the 15-year MACRS class life.

Bonus DepreciationAs a means of stimulating the economy, a 50 percent bonus depreciation was temporarily implemented in 2008 and subsequently extended through 2014. For the period between September 8, 2010, and before January 1, 2012, it was even boosted to 100 percent. Bonus depreciation applies to personal tangible property placed in service during the year for which the original use began with the taxpayer.

The 50% bonus depreciation has been extended for 2 years (through 2016) for property placed in service before January 1, 2017. This generally applies to property with a class life of 20 years or less, to qualified leasehold improvements and to certain plants bearing fruits and nuts that are planted or grafted before January 1, 2020.

Enhanced First-Year Depreciation for Autos and TrucksThis is the so-called “luxury limit on the deprecation deduction of passenger automobiles and light trucks used for business. For such vehicles placed in service in 2015, the limits are $3,160 and $3,460, respectively. In the past, the bonus depreciation had increased the firstyear luxury limits by $8,000. Under the new law, the bonus depreciation applicable to luxury vehicles will be phased out through 2019. Thus, the luxury auto rates will be increased by the following bonus depreciation rates: $8,000 for 2015 through 2017, $6,000 for 2018 and $4,800 for 2019.

As you can tell taxes can be complicated with all the laws and constant changes. If you need help contact us. This is what we do for our clients. 🙂

By | 2016-01-14T21:09:09-07:00 January 14th, 2016|Accounting, Blog|Comments Off on New Tax Law Extenders for Businesses

About the Author: